Genealogical Databases

Join us tomorrow (July 15th) at 2:00 p.m. in the Meeting Room, for a program about the major genealogical databases (Ancestry.com, Fold3, and HeritageQuest) our library subscribes to.

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Fold3

The Fold3 database has been restored for us.  You should be able to access it again from your home computer by logging in using your library barcode. If you have any problems, please call us and ask for adult reference. 

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Fold3

The Fold3 database is currently not allowing full access. We have notified them of the problem and hopefully this issue will be resolved soon. 

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Ancestry.com Library Edition Update

I have not received any official word on this, but it appears that Ancestry.com Library Edition database is working again. 

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Message from Ancestry.com concerning Library Edition Outage

“Around 1:30 p.m. MT on Monday, June 16, 2014, attackers targeted Ancestry with a Distributed Denial of Service attack (DDoS). During the attack, Ancestry websites along with the Find A Grave website were clogged with massive amounts of bogus traffic that took the sites down.” Ancestry.com is working to restore all services as quickly as possible.

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Familysearch.org Program

Join us this Thursday (June 19th) at 7:00 p.m. when we explore the genealogical website Familysearch.org. This event is free and open to all.  It will be held in our Community Room.

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Pennsylvania Death Certificates on Ancestry.com

Someone asked me how she could obtain a death certificate for a relative who died in Pittston, Pennsylvania in 1910. She was delighted to learn that just this past April, Ancestry.com added Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1924, to their online collection. She was able to obtain her ancestor’s death certificate free of charge by using Ancestry.com within our library building. To learn more about these records go to http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/04/18/pennsylvania-death-certificates-now-available/

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A Happy Ending for Some Old Photographs

Years ago I rescued a box of old photographs (mostly from the 1920s and 30s) that my father was looking to throw out. Although many of the photos were of my direct relatives (father and grandparents), there were some of my father’s uncles, aunts and cousins. Even though I dislike holding on to what could eventually become clutter, I decided to keep all of the photographs. Recently I connected with a second cousin through Ancestry.com, who was delighted to learn that I had pictures of her direct ancestors, and asked for copies of them. I scanned and emailed them to her, and I later noticed that she had posted them onto an historical website for Duryea, Pennsylvania to share with many others.  The website has a significant collection of old Duryea photographs, many of them family snapshots, but there are also others of buildings and various events. It is a website that would interest both genealogists and local historians. I am very happy to know that the photos my father was tossing out found a good home, and that they can now be viewed on http://www.duryeapa.com/contents.htm. So, next time you are tempted to send old photographs to the landfill, keep in mind that the internet might help you reunite your photos with their subject families and maybe even an entire community.

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Genealogists’ Declaration of Rights

The National Genealogical Society unveiled at their conference last week a Genealogists’ Declaration of Rights.  The declaration is a statement advocating open access to federal, state, and local public records.  You can read more about the NGS declaration by going to the website  http://www.fgs.org/rpac/

 

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Tracing Italian Immigrant History to the Italian Present

Join us this Monday (May 5th) at 7:00 p.m. when Dr. Salvatore Primeggia, a professor of sociology at Adelphia University, will speak on the history of Italian immigration to America. This lecture is free and open to the general public. This event is made possible through the Speakers in the Humanities program with the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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